Why It’s So Hard For Whites To Understand Ferguson

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Robert P. Jones in The Atlantic states: “One reason for the racial divide over Michael Brown’s death is that white Americans tend to talk mostly to other white people.” He goes on to say: “The shooting of unarmed black teenager Michael Brown by a white police officer in Ferguson, Missouri…has snapped the issue of race into national focus…causing many Americans to question just how far racial equality and race relations have come, even in an era of a black president and a black attorney general.” To read more, click here.

Chinese Americans In The Deep South

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joe-gow-nue-grocery-store-greenville-mississippi

From the Abagon blog, we learn that Chinese labourers were imported into the American South after the Civil War to replace emancipated black slaves. However, the plan failed as the Chinese left the plantations and moved north. Some of those who stayed in the South became grocers to black sharecroppers, and plantation commissaries gave way to Chinese grocery stores. To read more, click here.

Universal Protections For All

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In her last opening statement to the United Nations Human Rights Council, outgoing High Commissioner for Human Rights, Navi Pillay, stressed  the need for all countries to ensure universal protection of individuals and groups from abuse. To read more, click here.

Anti-Semitism in Greece: How Real?

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w.goldendawngreece-052214In a recent article in The Jewish Daily Forward, Gavin Rabinowitz discusses the ADL (Anti-Defamation League) report that Greece is the most anti-semitic nation in Europe. Reporting on a global anti-Semitism survey Gavin states, “With 69 percent of Greeks espousing anti-Semitic views, according to the survey, Greece was on par with Saudi Arabia, more anti-Semitic than Iran (56 percent) and nearly twice as anti-Semitic as Europe’s second-most anti-Semitic country, France (37 percent). To read more, click here.

What Does It Mean To Be White?

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In The Seattle Times, guest columnist Robin DiAngelo writes about  the roots of racial illiteracy. He points out that mainstream sources—schools, textbooks, media and anecdotal evidence—do not provide whites with the multiple perspectives needed to understand white racial identity. Such socialization renders whites racially illiterate. DiAngelo also states that people cannot understand how racism functions in the U.S. today if they ignore group power relations. To read more, click here

Poverty-Busters: Native American Success

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Christina Rose, reporting in Indian Country Today Media Network, says that, according to the Bureau of Indian Affairs, South Dakota is home to some of the harshest poverty-stricken areas in Indian country. While the sluggish economy throughout the United States has been part of the problem, Indian organizations and individuals are working to change the status quo.  To read more, click here.

Slave Descendants Seek Equal Rights From Cherokee Nation

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A new lawsuit challenges the exclusion of African-descended Cherokees from tribal benefits

A new lawsuit challenges the exclusion of African-descended Cherokees from tribal benefits

As reported in Salon, a media news blog,  David Cornsilk is Cherokee, a self-taught civil rights advocate, and genealogist. He traces his slave-owning ancestors back to their aboriginal lands in Georgia and Tennessee. Cornsilk is not a Cherokee Freedmen descendant, a black who descended from slaves once owned by Cherokee and other tribes. Yet, for nearly two decades, Cornsilk fought for the rights of Freedmen descendants to have tribal benefits. To read more, click here.

The Miniature Earth

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If the Earth had only 100 people, this is what it would be like. The haunting video is an important reminder about world poverty and interconnection. To read more about the Miniature Earth Project, click here.

In Blind Pursuit of Racial Equality?

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“Colorblindness” has emerged as central strategy for managing racial diversity in schools, business, politics, and the law, with the hope that deemphasizing racial differences will lead to equality, tolerance and inclusion. However, a research study from the Kellogg School of Management shows that promoting colorblindness can lead people to turn a blind eye to even overt examples of racial discrimination and hamper the prospect for intervention. The study suggests that the predominant U.S. approach to cross-cultural relations is flawed. To read more, click here.

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